6221 US Highway 61/67
Imperial, MO 63052

Phone : (636) 464-0777

Fax : (636) 464-2088

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Dance of the Honeybees!!!!

screen-shot-2016-09-09-at-3-23-35-pmPoor Norman, the basset, was out for a walk on a long lead when he crossed a swarm of honeybees in a ditch he was investigating. Norman was covered in bees in seconds. His parents quickly got a hose and squirted the bees off of him. Norman became very weak and was having difficulty breathing. His parents gave him some benadryl and rushed him right in to our hospital.

Norman was quickly taken to our treatment area. He was evaluated for anaphylactic shock and treated accordingly. The doctors had to remove over 30 stingers. Thanks to his parents quick actions Norman recovered well and went home that evening.

Dogs, like people, can experience anaphylactic shock. Anaphylaxis, in dogs, primarily targets the cardiovascular system and the gastrointestinal system, with respiratory signs developing secondarily. Symptoms develop almost immediately (usually within minutes) after exposure. The first signs of anaphylactic shock in dogs usually include very rapid onset of one or more of the following:

* Diarrhea
* Defecation
* Urination
* Vomiting
* Itchiness (pruritis)
* Development of hives (urticaria)

These symptoms quickly progress to one or more of the following:

* Weakness
* Lethargy
* Drooling (hypersalivation)
* Shallow, rapid and difficult breathing (respiratory distress; dyspnea)
* Pale gums and other mucous membranes

* Elevated heart rate (tachycardia)
* Weak pulses
* Cold limbs
* Changes in mental clarity (excitement or depression)

Dogs suffering anaphylactic episodes normally do not have severe or obvious swelling around their throat or face, unless the allergen came into contact with the dog in that area. Dogs having hypersensitivity reactions to allergens such as bee stings, vaccines or other pharmaceutical injections may develop mild to moderate swelling or bruising around the entry site. If any or even some of these signs appear suddenly in your dog, take him or her to a veterinarian right away. Anaphylactic shock is almost always fatal if not treated immediately. Read more from this great article by clicking here.

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